Women’s Rights in 2013—The Good, The Bad and the Ugly

by Alexander Sanger

As we reflect on the events of 2013, I can’t help but think of the Clint Eastwood classic The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.

When it came to women’s rights, there was indeed ugliness: more and more states tried to restrict women’s access to basic reproductive health care, and in El Salvador, Glenda Cruz was sentenced to 10 years in prison for miscarrying.

Despite these setbacks, there is reason for hope. Here’s my wrap-up of the top five wins for sexual and reproductive rights in 2013:

1. The rape and murder of a 23 year-old woman in New Delhi set off widespread protests throughout India. In September, an Indian court sentenced the four perpetrators to death, stating that the crime “shocked the collective conscience of India.”

“In these times when crimes against women are on the rise,” said Judge Yogesh Khanna, “the court cannot turn a blind eye to this gruesome act.” The significance of this statement condemning violence against women in the world’s second most populous country cannot be understated at a time when one in three women worldwide will experience violence in their lifetimes.

2. In the Dominican Republic, the Catholic Church filed a legal complaint against our local partner Profamilia, claiming that its ad campaign on sexual rights violated the Constitution. In May, the Fifth Civil and Commercial Chamber of the National District rejected the Church’s complaint as a violation of freedom of expression, adding that campaigns like Profamilia’s help to promote comprehensive sexuality education and responsible parenthood. The public and media support for Profamilia during and after the case was massive, but it was not an easy battle.

3. As more states sought measures to tighten abortion laws, some fought to make it more accessible. In June, Texas senator Wendy Davis rose to national prominence during a 13-hour filibuster protesting SB5, a bill that would further restrict abortion access in Texas. While the legislation ultimately passed, a vigorous protest from Davis — and supporters throughout the country — was heard loud and clear. In California, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a measure into law that allows nurse practitioners, certified nurse-midwives and physicians’ assistants who complete specified training to perform abortions.

4. On August 15, the first session of the Regional Conference on Population and Development concluded as representatives of 38 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean adopted an historic agreement: the Montevideo Consensus on Population and Development. At this meeting to assess progress towards implementing the Cairo Programme of Action, governments recognized the important connections between sexual and reproductive health and rights and the global development agenda. More than 250 members of civil society — including IPPF/WHR and our Member Associations — helped forge this victory. The Consensus is the first UN agreement to include a definition of sexual rights, “which embrace the right to a safe and full sex life, as well as the right to take free, informed, voluntary and responsible decisions on their sexuality, sexual orientation and gender identity, without coercion, discrimination or violence.” With governments poised to adopt a new global development framework, this agreement will help ensure that sexual rights and reproductive rights remain at the center of efforts to reduce poverty and improve the well-being of individuals, communities and nations.

5. Perhaps the greatest “good” is the fact that despite fierce opposition, millions of women, men and young people throughout the world continue to fight to ensure that all people have access to quality healthcare and protection of their human rights. In 2012, we provided nearly 33 million services throughout the Americas and Caribbean with more than 75% of those services reaching poor and vulnerable populations. In a region where an estimated 95% of abortions take place in unsafe circumstances, the importance of access to contraception and accurate health information cannot be underestimated.

Source:http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alexander-sanger/the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly-womens-rights-in-2013_b_4519800.html

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